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IfA Hilo Outreach - Koa's Resources

Gods & Goddesses Related to Mauna O Wakea

  • Wakea:   Sky Father who mated with Papa to give birth to all the island children. Mauna Kea is known to many Hawaiians as Mauna O Wakea or Ka Mauna A Kea (Wakea’s Mountain).
  • Papa Hanau Moku (Haumea):   Mother Earth, woman who gave birth to islands. Papa and Wakea are the progenitors of the Hawaiian people.
  • Poli`ahu:   Goddess of Mauna O Wakea (today often called Mauna Kea), she is the goddess of snow, ice, and cold. The summit of Mauna Loa also is hers, though she occasionally still has arguments with Pele regarding that mountain. She is the eldest daughter of Kane. Her younger sisters are her ladies in waiting. Many men have pursued her.
  • Lilinoe:   She is the goddess of fine mist. She also is the goddess of Haleakala, of dead fires, and of desolation. She dresses Poliahu's hair so that it is soft and fine, and floats like a cloud about her.
  • Wai`au:   Guardian of the lake, which bears her name. She bathes Poli`ahu, and refreshes her drinking gourd with sweet water, which she can fetch by using her bird form to fly from place to place.
  • Kahoupokane:   Goddess of Hualalai, and a master kapa maker. When the heavy rains come from the mountains, she is throwing water on her kapa as she beats it. When thunder rolls, that is the sound of beating the kapa. The flash of lightning is when she flips the bright new kapa over to beat the other side. The morning after the storm, her kapa can be seen drying on the mountains, shining in the sunlight. On a sunny day, when there is thunder and a fine misty rain, but no clouds, you know she is pounding their summer garments.
  • Lea:   Goddess of canoe building one of her kinolau (body form) is Elepai`o-A little forest bird that guides to the proper tree for cutting down. Warns of tree being bad by landing on the tree and pecking on it, showing the wood is damaged or bugs in the tree.
  • La`amaomao:   Goddess of the winds that could be called upon to guide the people on their journeys.
  • Kukahau`ula:   God Ku of the red hued dew. A male deity and lover of Poli`ahu.


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