University of Hawaii Instutute for Astronomy
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IfA Publications
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Open House 2008
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For immediate release
April 19, 2006

Contacts:


Dr. Gareth Wynn-Williams
Institute for Astronomy
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822
1-808-956-8807
wynnwill@ifa.hawaii.edu

Mrs. Karen Rehbock
Assistant to the Director
Institute for Astronomy
University of Hawaii at Manoa
1-808-956-6829
rehbock@ifa.hawaii.edu

High Resolution Photos:

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Captions on right.

Institute for Astronomy
Director's office
2680 Woodlawn Drive Honolulu, Hawaii 96822
Telephone: 1-808-956-8566
Fax: 1-808-946-3467



Maintained by LG

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Institute for Astronomy Open House 2006

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Suu Suu Jewitt and Cole Denneau examine Io, one of the satellites of Jupiter. Photo montage by Karen Teramura and Kathryn Whitman.

How do you build a rocket?

What are the latest discoveries from Mauna Kea?

Why does "dark matter" matter?

For answers to these questions, head for the annual UH Institute for Astronomy Open House on Sunday, April 30 from 11 am to 4 pm at its Manoa headquarters on Woodlawn Drive.

New this year will be an opportunity to simulate a Mars landing (using raw eggs), learn about King Kalakaua's enthusiasm for astronomy, and watch a puppet show that connects Hawaiian culture and modern astronomy.

There will also be family lectures on hot astronomical topics such as the Deep Impact mission, dark matter, and the origin of the oceans, plus accounts of recent observing expeditions by Hawaii astronomers to the Sahara Desert and Antarctica.

Children will have the opportunity to make comets, travel through space in our Starlab planetarium, and engage in a "find the planet" hunt. There will be telescopes available to safely view the sun, the moon, and Venus, as well as practical advice for novice amateur astronomers on how to buy and use telescopes and astronomy software.

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Bottle rockets in production before launch time. Photo by Karen Teramura.

Kupuna Leilehua Omphroy and the Hawai`iana O Honomu, a troupe of eight educators, are traveling from Hilo with their 18 hand-carved puppets to present "`Ano Lani `Ano Honua, the Relationship between Heaven and Earth." They have been performing shows to great acclaim on the Big Island over the past year; this is their first visit to Oahu.

There will be tours of the IfA's research laboratories, where visitors will be able to see the world's largest digital camera under construction.

Other Oahu astronomy groups that will be represented at the IfA Open House will include the Hawaiian Astronomical Society and the Bishop Museum. Hawaii's budding astronomers will be represented by several schoolchildren who will be exhibiting their displays from the recent Schools Science Fair.

Admission and parking are free.

For more information, go to http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/open-house.


PICTURE CAPTIONS

Figure 1: Suu Suu Jewitt and Cole Denneau examine Io, one of the satellites of Jupiter. Photo montage by Karen Teramura and Kathryn Whitman.

Figure 2: Bottle rockets in production before launch time. Photo by Karen Teramura.

Figure 3: Learning how the mirrors in telescopes work. Photo by Karen Teramura.

Figure 4: A tour of the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility laboratory includes a demonstration with liquid nitrogen, which is used as a coolant for infrared instruments. Photo by Karen Teramura.


The Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii conducts research into galaxies, cosmology, stars, planets, and the sun. Its faculty and staff are also involved in astronomy education, deep space missions, and in the development and management of the observatories on Haleakala and Mauna Kea.

Established in 1907 and fully accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, the University of Hawaii is the state's sole public system of higher education. The UH System provides an array of undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees and community programs on 10 campuses and through educational, training, and research centers across the state. UH enrolls more than 50,000 students from Hawaii, the U.S. mainland, and around the world.

 

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