ASTR 110L                                                                                                                                                                                          Name:                            

Fall 2009

Magnitudes & Constellations Worksheet — Scorpius & Sagittarius Region

 

Read:  Ridpath, Stars & Planets, pp. 6–12 (naming system for stars & constellations; magnitude system for stellar brightnesses). 

 

On the attached Scorpius (Sco) and Sagittarius (Sgr) star chart, do the following:

 

1. (6 pts.)  Using naked-eye observing, estimate the visual magnitude of each star shown on this chart, using a scale of 0 (very brightest) to 4 or 5 (faintest visible from a bright city location, depending on your eyesight).  Round each magnitude to the nearest integer, and write the magnitude next to each star. 

        Note:  If your vision is very good, you may be able to see down to magnitude 5 or fainter, especially in a darker location than Kapiolani Park, farther from city lights.  If your vision is worse, then the very faintest stars may be blurred out and not visible to you — they will disappear into the overall background sky brightness.  Also, the presence of a bright Moon fills the sky with scattered light and prevents us from seeing 5th or sometimes even 4th-magnitude stars. 

 

2. (2 pts.)  Use your binoculars to scan the entire region shown in the chart.  Plot any star clusters, nebulae, or other faint objects that show up in your binoculars that were not visible to your naked eye. 

 

3. (optional)  Using naked-eye observing, can you see the boundary of the “milky” part of the Milky Way in this region?  If so, lightly sketch its boundary/edges.  (Note: This may not be possible from a bright location like Kapiolani Park, or on a night with a bright Moon.) 

 

4. (1 pt.)  If any stars have very distinctive colors, label them with their colors.  (Hint:  There’s definitely one reddish star!  Be sure to label it.) 

 

5. (1 pt.)  Estimate the angular size (in degrees) of the entire map, using your hand.  Record its height and width in degrees somewhere along the side of the map. 

 

 

 


Later, as homework:

 

6. (1 pt.)  “Connect the dots” to show the outline/stick-figure of Scorpius (also known as “Maui’s Fishhook”) and Sagittarius (at least the “Teapot” part — not all of Sgr is shown on this chart). 

 

7. a. (6 pts.)  Use the Scorpius and Sagittarius maps in Stars & Planets to label EACH STAR shown on this chart with its Bayer letter (lower-case Greek letters, for brighter stars) or its Flamsteed number (for fainter stars).  The Greek alphabet appears in Ridpath on p. 10.  A few stars are named with capital roman letters, like G Scorpii. 

                Note:  Three stars on the chart belong to neither Sco nor Sgr… can you identify their names anyway?  You may need to consult maps of neighboring constellations. 

 

b. (1 pt.)  Label Antares (the brightest star in Scorpius) with its name — this is one of the stars that you will need to learn to recognize this semester. 

 

8. (2 pts.)  Use the same maps in Stars & Planets to label the names of the faint objects that you plotted in part (2).  (Most of them will have names starting with a capital “M”.) 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ASTR 110L                                                                                                                                                                                          Name:                            

Spring 2006

Magnitudes & Constellations Worksheet

Orion & Canis Major

 

Reading:  Ridpath, Stars & Planets, pp. 4–10 (naming system for stars & constellations; magnitude system for stellar brightnesses). 

 

On the attached Orion (Ori) and Canis Major (CMa) star chart, do the following:

 

1. (5 pts.)  Using naked-eye observing, estimate the visual magnitude of each star shown on this chart, using a scale of 0 (very brightest) to 4 (faintest visible from a bright city location).  Round each magnitude to the nearest integer, and write the magnitude next to each star. 

                Note:  If your vision is very good, you may be able to see down to magnitude 5 or fainter, especially in a darker location than Kapiolani Park.  If your vision is worse, then the very faintest stars may be blurred out and not visible to you — they will appear to be part of the background sky brightness. 

 

2. (2 pts.)  Use your binoculars to scan the entire region shown in the star chart.  Plot any star clusters, nebulae, or other faint objects that show up in your binoculars that were not visible to your naked eye. 

 

3. (optional)  Using naked-eye observing, can you see the boundary of the “milky” part of the Milky Way in this region?  If so, lightly sketch its boundary/edges.  This may not be possible from a bright location like Kapiolani Park. 

 

4. (1 pt.)  If any stars have very distinctive colors, label them with their colors.  (Hint:  There’s definitely one reddish star!  Be sure to label it.) 

 

5. (1 pt.)  Estimate the angular size (in degrees) of the entire map, using your hand.  Write its height and width in degrees somewhere next to the map. 

 

 

Later, as homework:

 

6. a. (4 pts.)  Use the Orion and Canis Major maps in Ridpath to label each star shown on this chart with its Bayer letter (lower-case Greek letters, for brighter stars) or its Flamsteed number (for fainter stars).  The Greek alphabet appears in Ridpath on p. 8.  (A few stars are named with capital roman letters, like “R” Canis Majoris, but you may not have any on your chart.) 

                Note:  A few of the stars may lie outside of Orion and Canis Major… can you correctly label them anyway?  You may need to consult maps of neighboring constellations. 

 

b. (1 pt.)  Label Betelgeuse, Rigel, and Sirius with their names — these are three of the stars that you will need to learn to recognize this semester..

 

c. (1 pt.)  Also label the names of the faint objects that you plotted in part (2).  (Most will have names starting with a capital “M”.) 

 

7. (optional)  If you wish, “connect the dots” to show the outline/stick-figures of Orion and Canis Major.