Viewing Mars

In Fall 2005, Mars will come nearly as close to Earth as it did two years ago; in some ways, this passage will provide better views than the last one.


This table provides simulated images and other data for Mars every Wednesday from late September through the end of the semester. Each date links to an image showing how Mars will look at 21:30 HT (9:30 pm). The altitude column gives the angle between Mars and the horizon as seen from Honolulu; large altitudes provide the best views. The diameter column gives the angular diameter of the planet. The longitude column indicates what part of Mars will be facing the Earth. The final column lists some surface features which may be visible.

Date Altitude
(degrees)
Diameter
(arc-seconds)
Long.
(degrees)
Visible Features
09/28/05 7.0 17.6 248 M. Tyrrhenum, M. Clmmerium
10/05/05 13.5 18.5 185 M. Clmmerium, M. Sirenum
10/12/05 20.6 19.3 122 M. Sirenum, Olympus
10/19/05 28.4 19.8 59 M. Erythraeum, Solis Lacus
10/26/05 36.8 20.2 357 Sinus Meridiani, Sinus Sabaeus
11/02/05 45.4 20.1 296 Syrtis Major, Hellas
11/09/05 54.2 19.7 234 M. Tyrrhenum, M. Clmmerium
11/16/05 62.7 19.0 172 M. Clmmerium, M. Sirenum
11/23/05 70.6 18.0 110 M. Sirenum, Solius Lacus
11/30/05 77.7 16.9 47 M. Erythraeum, M. Acidalium
12/07/05 82.9 15.7 344 Sinus Meridiani, Sinus Sabaeus

Web Resources


Joshua E. Barnes (barnes@ifa.hawaii.edu)
Last modified: September 30, 2005
http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/~barnes/ASTR110L_F05/marsviewing.html
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