202. Electromagnetism and Plasma Physics. W

Topics in classical radiation: multipole radiation, synchrotron and Cerenkov radiation, Compton scattering, bremsstrahlung, stimulated and coherent emission, diffraction and scattering. Topics in plasma physics: plasma waves, Debye length, adiabatic invariants, wave propagation in plasmas, Landau damping, two-stream instability. (Also offered as Physics 213. Students may not receive credit for both courses.) Offered in alternate academic years. G. Blumenthal

204A. Physics of Astrophysics I. W

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, perturbation theory, action angle variables, classical field, elasticity, kinetic theory, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, density matrix, quantum field theory, equation of state. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Offered in alternate academic years. D. Lin

*204B. Physics of Astrophysics II.

Fluid mechanics, equation of motion, inviscid and viscous flow, boundary layers, turbulence, compressibility, sound and non-linear waves, heat and momentum transport, instabilities, magnetohydrodynamics, Alfven waves, antipolar diffusion, plasma physics, stability. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Offered in alternate academic years. G. Blumenthal

205. Introduction to Astronomical Research. F

Lectures by UCSC faculty on current areas of astronomical and astrophysical research being carried out locally. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. G. Smith

210. Stellar Atmospheres. S

Radiative transfer, model atmospheres, formation of continua and lines. Topics in stellar spectroscopy. Offered in alternate academic years. F. Shu

220A. Stellar Structure and Evolution. F

Survey of stellar structure and evolution. Physical properties of stellar material. Convective and radiative energy transport. Stellar models and evolutionary tracks through all phases. Comparison with observations. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. P. Bodenheimer

220B. Star and Planet Formation. W

Theory of star formation. Interpretation of observations in star forming regions. Theory and observations of protoplanetary disks. Origin and evolution of the solar nebula. Formation and evolution of the terrestrial planets and the giant planets. Prerequisite: course 220A. Offered in alternate academic years. P. Bodenheimer

220C. Advanced Stages of Stellar Evolution and Nucleosynthesis. S

The evolution of massive stars beyond helium burning; properties of white dwarf stars; physics and observations of novae, supernovae, and other high energy stellar phenomena; nuclear systematics and reaction rates; the origin and production of all the chemical elements. Prerequisite: course 220A. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Offered in alternate academic years. S. Woosley

*222. Planetary Science.

Gross dynamical and chemical properties of solar system, interior structure, plate tectonics, atmosphere of terrestrial planets, structure and evolution of giant planets, generation of magnetic fields, planet-satellite tidal interaction, planetary rings, comets, meteorites, formation and long-term stability of solar system. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Offered in alternate academic years. The Staff

*224. Origin and Evolution of the Universe.

Introduction to the particle physics and cosmology of the very early universe: relativistic cosmology, initial conditions, inflation and grand unified theories, baryosynthesis, nucleosynthesis, gravitational collapse, hypotheses regarding the dark matter and consequences for formation of galaxies and large scale structure. (Also offered as Physics 224. Students may not receive credit for both courses.) Enrollment restricted to graduate students. Offered in alternate academic years. (Formerly The Very Early Universe.) The Staff

225. Physics of Compact Objects. F

Physics of dense matter: equations of state. Structure and cooling of white dwarfs and neutron stars. Observations and phenomenology of pulsars. Elementary relativity; properties of black holes. Compact objects in binary systems: X-ray sources, binary pulsars. Pulsars in globular clusters. Offered in alternate academic years. S. Thorsett

*226. General Relativity.

Develops the formalism of Einstein’s general relativity, including solar system tests, gravitational waves, cosmology, and black holes. (Also offered as Physics 226. Students may not receive credit for both courses.) Enrollment restricted to graduate students. The Staff

*230. Low-Density Astrophysics.

Fundamental physical theory of gaseous nebulae and the interstellar medium. Ionization, thermal balance, theory and observation of emission spectra. Interstellar absorption lines, extinction by interstellar dust. Ultraviolet, optical, infrared, and radio spectra of gaseous nebulae. Offered in alternate academic years. W. Mathews

*231. Astrophysical Gas Dynamics.

A study of compressible gas and plasma dynamics. Transport coefficients. Linear waves and gravitational, thermal, shear, and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. One-dimensional unsteady flow. Shock and ionization fronts. Numerical gas dynamics. Similarity solutions. Winds and accretion flows. Offered in alternate academic years. W. Mathews

233. Physical Cosmology. S

Survey of modern physical cosmology, including Newtonian cosmology, curved space-times, observational tests of cosmology, the early universe, inflation, nucleosynthesis, dark matter, and the formation of structure in the universe. Prerequisite: course 202. Offered in alternate academic years. G. Blumenthal

*237. Accretion in Early and Late Stages of Stellar Evolution.

Theories of spherical accretion, structure and stability of steady-state accretion disks, and the evolution of time-dependent accretion disks. Applications of these theories to the formation of the solar system as well as the structure and evolution of dwarf novae and X-ray sources are emphasized. Offered in alternate academic years. The Staff

*240A-*B. Galactic and Extragalactic Stellar Systems.

Nature and evolution of galaxies and the universe, origin of galaxies, and cosmological models. Structure and dynamics of galaxies. Nature of QSOs and active galaxies. The early universe and the cosmic blackbody radiation. Offered in alternate academic years. S. Faber

*253. Stellar Dynamics.

Kinematics and relaxation of stellar systems. Potential and orbit theories. Dynamics of globular clusters, spiral and elliptical galaxies. Dynamical friction, mergers, and galactic cannibalism. Galaxy clustering in the early universe. D. Lin

257. Modern Observational Techniques. F

Astronomical telescopes and detectors. Astronomical observing techniques. The reduction of observations. Machine shop practice in instrument construction. Offered in alternate academic years. M. Bolte

*260. Instrumentation for Astronomy.

An introduction to astronomical instrumentation for infrared and visible wavelengths. Topics include instrument requirements imposed by dust, atmosphere, and telescope; optical, mechanical, and structural design principles and components; electronic and software instrument control. Imaging cameras and spectrographs are described. Offered in alternate academic years. Enrollment restricted to graduate students. J. Nelson, T. Mast

*275. Radio Astronomy.

Theory and practice of radio telescopes, radiometers, and data handling systems. Principles of aperture synthesis. Theory of continuum and line radio emission mechanisms, and application to actual astronomical observations. Galactic radio sources, quasars, and pulsars. Offered in alternate academic years. S. Thorsett

289. Special Topics in Astrophysics.

Occasional courses in particular areas of current interest. The Staff

292. Seminar (no credit). F,W,S

Seminar attended by faculty, graduate students, and upper-division undergraduate students. The Staff

297. Independent Study. F,W,S

Independent study or research for graduate students who have not yet begun work on their theses. Prerequisite: petition on file with sponsoring agency. The Staff

299. Thesis Research. F,W,S

The Staff

301. Supervised Teaching Experience (no credit). F,W,S

In this noncredit course, the duly appointed graduate student will perform the normal duties of the teaching assistant (T.A.). The T.A. is to assist and be supervised by the academic staff member in charge of a regular course of instruction. Prerequisite: appointment by the dean. The Staff